How to Create a my Social Security Account

A personal my Social Security account is one of the most important tools in your online services tool belt. A my Social Security account puts you in control of your Social Security record. Opening an account is quick, secure, and easy. Create your personal my Social Security account today!

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April is National Social Security Month

Here is the Social Security article reprinted in full. Or go to their link to read it.

National Social Security Month Shines a Light on Our Online Services

In April, we celebrate National Social Security Month, and highlight our agency’s mission and purpose. We’re with you throughout life’s journey — from birth, to marriage, and into retirement — and we’re always searching for ways to give you easy and secure access to everything we offer.

We are constantly expanding our online services to give you freedom and control in how you wish to conduct business with us. Our online services help you plan for the future and keep you in control of your benefits. You can go online to:

  1. Find out if you qualify for benefits;
  2. Use our benefit planners to help you better understand your Social Security protection;
  3. Estimate your future retirement benefits to help you plan for your financial future;
  4. Retire online, or apply for Medicare quickly and easily; and
  5. Open your personal my Social Security Your personal account is the most powerful tool to help you stay in control of your Social Security record. If you don’t receive benefits yet, you can:
    • Get your Social Security Statement to review your earnings, make sure they’re recorded correctly;
    • Get a benefit verification letter to prove you don’t receive Social Security benefits or that you applied but haven’t received an answer yet;
    • Request a replacement Social Security card if you meet certain requirements; and
    • Check the status of your application or appeal a decision.

If you receive benefits, you can:

  1. Change your address and phone number;
  2. Get a benefit verification letter to prove you receive Social Security benefits, Supplemental Security Income (SSI), or Medicare;
  3. Start deposits or change your direct deposit information at any time;
  4. Get a replacement Medicare card; and
  5. Get a replacement Benefit Statement (SSA-1099 or SSA-1042S) for tax purposes.

Do you own a business? You can also use our Business Services Online suite to report employee wages and verify names and Social Security numbers for W-2s.

Join us and celebrate National Social Security Month by seeing everything you can do online!

 

10 Handy Ways to Use Social Security Online

There are many easy ways to use our website. Here are some common and not-so common uses:

Apply for Social Security benefits online, of course! This is the fastest, most convenient way to apply for retirement, spouses, disability, or Medicare benefits, without visiting a local office or calling to speak to a representative.

Want access to our latest news, retirement planning tips, and sound guidance? You’ve come to the right place – our blog, Social Security Matters. You can also connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and YouTube, where you can watch our popular videos.

Verify your annual earnings and review estimates of your future Social Security benefits when you access your Social Security Statement, one of the many services available with a my Social Security account.

Numbers can tell a story. Our online calculators such as the Retirement Estimator, the Life Expectancy Calculator, and the Early or Late Retirement Calculator, can be found on our calculators page.

Lost or missing Social Security card? Find out how to get a new, replacement, or corrected card. In fact, you may be able to apply for a replacement card with a my Social Security account, if you meet certain qualifications.

Noah, Emma, Liam, Olivia…are these the most popular baby names for 2016 in the U.S. or in your state? Discover the trends in baby names, or take our online quiz to help you pick the ideal name.

Do you have to pay taxes on Social Security benefits? How do I apply for Social Security retirement benefits? What is your full retirement age? Discover the answers to your Social Security related questions at our Frequently Asked Questions page.

Dream of moving to London, Paris, or the Cayman Islands? Learn how Social Security makes international payments and how you can do business with us from around the world.

Are you a veteran? Are you at mid-career? Or maybe you’re new to the workforce. Find out how we fulfill your needs throughout life’s journey on our People Like Me page.

If you like to read and prefer to know all the details, our publications webpage is a library of helpful information.

Simple, easy to use, beneficial, and always here to help you secure today and tomorrow, visit us today.

Five Ways Social Security Serves Our Veterans

On Veterans Day, we honor the men and women who proudly serve our country. Social Security is committed to helping our veterans. One of our priorities is to constantly improve the quality of service we provide to them and their families.

Here are five Social Security benefits every veteran should know about:

  1. Disability Services —The effects of military service can be profound and lasting. Social Security pays disability benefits to veterans through the Social Security disability insurance and the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) programs. Our disability insurance program pays benefits to you and certain members of your family if you’ve worked long enough and paid enough Social Security taxes to qualify.
  2. Accelerated processing for some Veteran claims —Veterans who have a VA compensation rating of 100 percent permanent and total (P&T) have the opportunity to receive expedited processing of applications for Social Security disability benefits.
  3. Help integrating back into the workforce — Our online guide, Journey to Success: Employment Tools for Veterans with Disabilities, highlights resources, such as career counseling, job training, employment services, and other ways that we help disabled veterans return to work.
  4. Career opportunities for Veterans — We offer several career options in diverse fields for our heroes as well as preference in hiring. You can learn more about how Social Security helps secure today and tomorrow for our veterans and their families on our veterans page.
  5. Benefits for WWII Veterans — Special benefits can be paid to some World War II veterans who served in the active United States military from September 16, 1940, through July 24, 1947. This includes Filipino veterans who served in the organized military of the Philippines from July 26, 1941, through December 30, 1946.

Acting Commissioner Nancy A. Berryhill said it best: “We honor and thank the brave men and women who served in our nation’s armed forces.” Let us always remember their courage and sacrifice.

Improve Your Retirement with a my Social Security Account

September was National Self-Improvement Month, but it’s always a good time to focus on your health and wellness. While you do that, make sure your retirement is healthy, too, by opening a secure, personal, my Social Security account.

Registering only takes a few minutes at www.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount. You’ll be asked some basic questions to verify your identity. Then you’ll choose a user name and password. Pretty soon you’ll be registered and have full access to many of our services.

At Social Security, our highest priority is protecting the privacy and security of the personal information we maintain on you and almost every American so you can rest assured that doing business online with us is both safe and secure.

Once you establish an account, you’ll have access to a wealth of information that will improve your chances of a successful retirement. You’ll be able to verify your earnings history, get an estimate of your future benefit amount at retirement, and get an estimate of your benefits should you become disabled.

With your my Social Security account you can view and print your Statement whenever you like.

You can also improve your experience of receiving retirement benefits by establishing a my Social Security account to manage your benefits. You can set up your Direct Deposit within minutes by going to my Social Security and signing up for an account. Then, go to the My Profile tab and follow the instructions on the screen. Once you establish a mySocial Security account, you’ll be able to change your address or update your direct deposit, print a benefit verification letter, get a replacement Medicare card and a replacement SSA-1099 or SSA-1042S statement.

Once you’ve established your my Social Security account, you’ll want to check out our redesigned website. We’ve done some self-improvement of our own based on your suggestions, and we’ve made all of our services available from the home page. We’ve also made our website easier to navigate and more accessible on mobile devices such as tablets and smart phones.

Why not join the nearly 36 million who have improved their chances at a good retirement by establishing an account on my Social Security at www.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount.

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Learning the Lingo of Social Security

Is Social Security a topic in your conversations these days? Are you familiar with the lingo used to describe Social Security benefits, or does it sound like a new vocabulary to you?

Social Security employees strive to explain benefits using easy-to-understand, plain language. But if a technical term or acronym (an abbreviation of the first letters of words in a phrase) that you don’t know slips into the conversation or appears in written material, you can easily find the meaning in our online glossary at www.socialsecurity.gov/agency/glossary

Social Security acronyms function as verbal shorthand in our financial planning conversations. If you’re nearing retirement, you may want to know what PIA (primary insurance amount), FRA (full retirement age), and DRCs (delayed retirement credits) mean. These terms involve your benefit amount based on when you decide to take it.

If you take your retirement benefit at FRA, you’ll receive the full PIA (amount payable for a retired worker who starts benefits at full retirement age). So, FRA is an age and PIA is an amount.

What about DRCs? Delayed retirement credits are the incremental increases added to the PIA if you delay taking retirement benefits beyond your full retirement age. If you wait to begin benefits beyond FRA — say, at age 68 or even 70 — your benefit increases.

Once you receive benefits, you get a COLA most years. But don’t expect a refreshing drink — a COLA is a Cost of Living Adjustment, and that usually means a little extra money in your monthly payment.

Knowing some of these terms can help you fine-tune your conversations about Social Security.  If one of those unknown terms or acronyms does come up in conversation, you can be the one to supply the definition using our online glossary. Sometimes learning the lingo can deepen your understanding of how Social Security works for you. Discover more at www.socialsecurity.gov.

Easy ways for millennials to prepare for retirement

Millennials are in the best position for planning, investing, and saving for your retirement; growing that nest egg as large as it can be. The sooner you start, the more money you will have.

There are two easy ways to prepare for retirement at a young age and both involve Social Security- you know, that thing that Baby Boomers say won’t be there when you retire!

Start a my Social Security account. Having a personal and secure account is easy, but better yet, it empowers you. You can access the services you need in the convenience of your own home without traveling to a local office and waiting in a long line. To view your social security statement, go to www.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount.

As you can see, many of our resources are available online and my Social Security is one of the best places to access vital information about your retirement. We are constantly adding new features to make your experience with us faster and more convenient. You can even replace a lost or stolen Social Security card in certain states.

Did you know that a 20-year-old worker has a 1-in-4 chance of becoming disabled before reaching full retirement age? Social Security will be there for you if you become disabled and cannot work. Accessing your online account can also help you determine your estimated future disability benefits, so why wait. Get started!