Failure To Establish Clear IP Ownership-What Every Startup Needs To Know Part 4

By Debby Winters

Failure to establish IP ownership rights can be a deal breaker in many business transactions. Due diligence analysis generally seeks to verify not only the startup’s ownership rights to each piece of IP but also to determine if there are any restrictions on its use. Typically IP ownership issues can be averted if addressed early, sometimes even before the incorporation of the startup.

Here are a few of the places where ownership should be established:

  1. Current Employment for the Founders
  2. Employees of the Startup
  3. Independent Contractors
  4. Startup Founders

In this blog, we will discuss the first topic and take up the other topics in subsequent blog posts.

Founders of many startups continue to work for their current employer while they establish the new company. The employer may have required that the Founder/employee sign a confidentiality or invention assignment agreement in which the employee agreed to assign all new ideas and inventions related to the employer’s business to the employer. This is particularly problematic if the startup product or service is closely related to the employer’s business as the employer may try to claim rights to the startup’s IP.

Thus, it is important that founders carefully review their current employment agreements and fully understand employment obligations, including IP assignment clauses and non-compete language. Employees should also consider discussing personal projects/inventions with their employer upfront to avoid ownership issues later down the road. Generally, employer resources or company time should not be used to develop projects for the startup company without the pre-approval of an employer and without the employer’s agreement not to claim ownership rights.

In the next blog, we will look at establishing ownership of IP with employees of the startup.

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